Building a sturdy foundation. / by Phu Qui Nguyen

I guess that last post will tie into with today as well.  Sometimes it's not always worth the time and energy consumed to complete a task.  And we always have to ask it's worth for our future pleasure as well.  What we can do today may set us up for better things tomorrow.  

So I've been compartmentalizing our workflow here.  In addition to improving our workspace, we had an extra corner for setting up for scanning film negative (which we hope to offer in the near future) and processing work as well.  What better way than to take something that is going to be thrown out and give it new life.  One man's trash is another man's treasure.  Well it wasn't trash.  Originally from a studio, the tabletop was hand built for another project.  Somebody put in the time to build it.  

Luckily we were able to salvage it from a bitter ending.  But one problem. It was amazingly wide and built for giants!  Approximately 10 feet corner to corner, I went to work mocking it up in photoshop right away to see how it'd fill out in my tiny office.   

Work Bench, Snaps by Jon. Modified by James N. July 2016

Work Bench, Snaps by Jon. Modified by James N. July 2016

At first I only knew the overall length and depth of the center.  With a little photoshop estimating magick, I was able to see what kind of cuts needed to be made.  Was it out of my scope? HECK NO!  I got out our eye protection and hand cut this with a jig saw.  118 to 78".  Was it difficult with a jig saw while eyeballing my cuts? HECK YES!

Ta-da! July 2016

Ta-da! July 2016

What wasn't shown was the initial rough cut, overhanging a bunch.  But after some test fits and trial and error, it couldn't have come out any better.  BUT there's still an issue.  There can be no table without a sturdy foundation.  This was floating with the help of some boxes.  

Later while I was talking with the boys at @EastForkSupplyCo with their experiences about standing desk legs.  The best idea for convenience was our buddy, Niko's Ikea extendable legs, but pricey at $35 a piece.  We would have to do 6 legs, totalling $210.  That price is realistic for furniture, but doesn't fit my $0 budget that I worked hard to achieve since the desktop was free.  Then Christian offered up some free 2x4".  That's something I could get behind!  But I didn't want to impose.  That did give me an idea of trying out 4x4" wood.   And quickly our budget went from $0 to $54 quickly which includes 20ft of 4x4", L-bracket supports, Danish oil, brushes, and additional screws.  Shout outs to Chhun @EastForkSupplyCo for helping me out with some tools. 

Home Run at Home Depot, July 2016

Home Run at Home Depot, July 2016

After quick home run!  Home Depot even cut the table legs to appropriate height.  I spent the morning, sanding these logs smooth and applied Danish oil (oil/varnish mixture).  After a double dip and wipe down, the table legs came to life and had this natural look fresh from the factory.  Check it out!!! Will be sharing some full pictures as soon as they are mounted.  It took us a good morning, but I'm feeling quite proud and accomplished today. 

Cut, sanded, and oiled.  July 2016

Cut, sanded, and oiled.  July 2016